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Picturesque Texas a La Braque

If I didn’t know that Georges Braque, the painter who invented cubism together with Pablo Picasso, lived long before we could enjoy satellite images, I would have sworn he had stolen the idea from Earth observation science. Just look for yourselves and observe how similar both Braque’s and Picasso’s paintings are to the above satellite image of a snow covered south-central USA!

I have shown this image on full screen and the reactions are always the same – people are stunned. The relief effect of this particular image is rather rare. Thanks to a combination of a low Sun and the thinly drizzled snow the land use becomes visible in forms of its characteristic geometric shapes. Round shaped irrigated fields, squared crop fields, river and road lines etc are easily identified – at least if you know what to look for and have some in-situ experience. Those huge round irrigated fields cannot be found in Norway. I remember I couldn’t believe my own eyes on my first visit to Texas when I saw the never ending fields that on  top of being over-dimensioned they were also artificially irrigated! Everything is big in Texas, indeed!

Every now and then this southern part of US experiences snow storms. The satellite images show the snow storm event of December 2009.

The Earth as Arts
Ever since I first laid my eyes on a satellite image I have been completely fascinated by their shear beauty. Pure and simple. Today I scan through new and old satellite images on a daily basis just because I cannot help myself – and sometimes for professional reasons of course. I decided I wanted to share some of my favorites with others through The Earth as Arts series here on A Green Space – A Green Earth blog. It will be brought to you once a week, normally on Mondays. Each satellite image is carefully selected based on its looks and not for its quality. My perspective will be both highly professional, deeply personal and sometimes colored by big events on planet Earth. Enjoy!

The Earth as Arts – Algerian Abstract

Seriously, this satellite image could just as well have been a piece of abstract art. It gives me the impression of being made out of different textures and material which of course it also is with sand dunes and rocks etc all included.

The image from Algeria is the first satellite image in a new series here at A Green Space – A Green Earth. This extreme birds-eye perspective on the Tassili n’Ajjer National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site in Algeria, was published on NASA’s Earth Observatory pages. It can also be found on their Flickr site.

What is striking with this particular image is the immense complexity of shapes and textures of the planetary surface. It looks like a complete mess, but of course underneath there is a structure and definitely an idea behind it. Just like many an abstract painting…

The many colors are created by looking at the park with Landsat-7 in different wavelengths: infrared, near-infrared, and visible light, that enhance the different rock types. Read more about the factual details here. And indulge yourself with a really big version of the satellite image here (9MB).

The Earth as Arts
Ever since I first laid my eyes on a satellite image I have been completely fascinated by their shear beauty. Pure and simple. Today I scan through new and old satellite images on a daily basis just because I cannot help myself – and sometimes for professional reasons of course. I decided I wanted to share some of my favorites with others through The Earth as Arts series here on A Green Space – A Green Earth blog. It will be brought to you once a week, normally on Mondays. Each satellite image is carefully selected based on its looks and not for its quality. My perspective will be both highly professional, deeply personal and sometimes colored by big events on planet Earth. Enjoy!

December 2014
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